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Measles outbreak in Laval: Several possible exposure sites

Updated on 1 July, 2019 
Published on June 30, 2019

Important

Following the report of a second case of measles in Laval over the course of a few days, the Ministère de la Santé et des Services sociaux is again issuing a warning to the public and updating the list of sites where individuals may have been exposed to the measles virus.

People are considered to be contagious if they visited a number of public places in Laval between June 25 and 29, 2019. People who were in those locations are considered at risk of exposure. A list of locations and precise dates and times is accessible at Quebec.ca/rougeole, The list will be updated should other measles cases or potential sites of exposure be reported.

The following individuals are considered to be at greater risk of complications if they are exposed to the virus, and should get checked so they can quickly get a preventive antibody injection:

  • Babies under 1 year old
  • People with weakened immune systems
  • Pregnant women who have not been fully vaccinated against measles

Individuals in the above groups who were at sites where they may have been exposed to measles at the times listed should contact Info-Santé 8-1-1 as soon as possible.

If you are not in one of the groups and were at one of the possible sites of exposure in Laval, there is no need for an immediate preventive intervention. However, keep an eye out for symptoms, especially if you haven’t been vaccinated. If you’re not sure if you’ve been appropriately vaccinated against measles, 

If you’re not sure if you’ve been appropriately vaccinated against measles, contact contact Info-Santé 8-1-1 or Québec.ca/rougeole.

Highlights

Measles is a very serious contagious disease. The main symptoms of measles are high fever followed by a rash.

Measles is caused by a virus that spreads through the air on droplets from the nose and throat of a person who is infected. It can take 7 to 14 days between exposure to the measles virus and onset of symptoms. A person is considered to be contagious 4 days before the rash appears, and can remain contagious up to 4 days after.

A person who has symptoms consistent with measles should limit contacts with other people and see a doctor. It is important that the person inform the medical clinic about his or her symptoms before or upon arriving to ensure the necessary precautions are put in place.

For more information about measles and to see the list of possible measles exposure site, go to Québec.ca/rougeole.

Sources

Public, News, Measles, Professionnel, Réseau de la santé, Direction de santé publique, MSSS

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Last Update : 19 July 2019